Why did the Chicago Bears change their logo?

The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago. The Bears compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league’s National Football Conference (NFC) North division.

This team has nine NFL championships under its belt, including one Super Bowl championship. They also hold NFL records for most Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees and the number of retired uniforms.

Chicago Bears
Chicago Bears

The Bears also have the most NFL victories under their belt. Sept. 20 of 1919 marked the beginning of the franchise’s existence in Decatur, Illinois, where it was based until 1920 when it moved to Chicago.



Only the Arizona Cardinals, who were founded in Chicago in 1920, are still in the NFL; the other is the New York Giants.

Soldier Field, on Chicago’s Near South Side, next to Lake Michigan, replaced Wrigley Field as the team’s home field until the 1970 season. The Chicago Bears and Green Bay Packers share a long-standing rivalry.

Halas Hall, the team’s headquarters, is located in Lake Forest, Illinois, a Chicago suburb. During the regular season, the Bears train in nearby facilities, but Halas Hall will host Training Camp starting in 2020 following extensive renovations.

Why did the Chicago Bears change their logo?

Because professional football clubs began placing emblems on players’ helmets in the late 1950s and early 1960s, the team decided to replace their previous emblem, which featured a black bear, with a new one.

The wishbone ‘C’ logo has been used by the Bears for almost 40 years, in contrast to the numerous distinct variations worn by other NFL organizations over the course of the league’s history.

The earlier form of the logo served as the inspiration for the current one, which was created in 1974. The only thing that has changed is the color scheme, which is now orange, white, and black. The body of the letter “C” is orange, while the double outline is white on the inside and black on the outside.